Research artefacts - 5/39 - Arts University Bournemouth

Image Collage Writing: Constructing Arguments in Pictorial Form

This workshop aimed to introduce ways to visualise a doctoral thesis through collage. The workshop was given as part of the Postgraduate Research Symposium held at Arts University Bournemouth on 5 December 2017.

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Methodology; educational action research merged with case study

Teachers possess a tacit knowing in their practice; they often know more than they can say, but their knowledge is sometimes unconscious or not articulated (Polanyi 1983).   To develop the effectiveness of their teaching, they can reflect on their actions-in-practice, asking themselves: what am I doing? Why am I doing it? What is the effect of my actions?  What action could I take to lead to a different outcome?

In my presentation I will explain how my methodology choice is driven by the professional, the personal, and the political (Nofke et al 2009 ) and  how I have utilised a  verstehen approach  (Gadamer 1997)  in working with my dyslexic acting students in my PhD study, and ongoing research.  My methodology is educational action research underpinned by case study; two separate methodologies, which are sometimes enveloped into one. Elliot has defined action research as ‘the study of a social situation with a view to improving the quality of the action within it’ (1991).  Thus, alongside case study, it has proved a valuable methodology for the development of teachers and the advancement of educational research. McNiff underlines that the action researcher is prompted into action by the realisation they are ‘not living in the direction of their values’ (McNiff 2006). To change a situation   one needs to fully understand the participants involved and their circumstances through the ‘lived experience’ of a case study environment, a deep observation, based within ‘bounded’ and ‘naturally occurring circumstances’ (Simons 2009). A criticism of case study and action research can be that the findings are subjective, rather than objective generalisations. In this presentation, I will elaborate on how I validated my findings through the use of the critical friend, validation group, and the participants’ voices. Finally, I will present the powerful role of narrative in promoting shared knowledge, and how ‘little stories’ can foster an understanding of individual worlds, stimulating questions about how those worlds may be changed, challenge working practices, including in educational settings (Cotton and Griffiths 2007).

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‘Towards accessing Shakespeare’s text for those with dyslexia: strategies to support the challenges and strengths of acting degree students with dyslexia’ (BERA)

How might actor-trainers meet the needs of student-actors with dyslexia, especially when interacting with Shakespeare’s text? How might our methods break away from practices that support the dominant group whilst undermining those whose processes, learning styles and strengths lie outside of conventional models? As a teacher of Voice and Acting on a university acting degree course, I regularly encounter acting students with dyslexia who experience difficulties working within the confines of traditional teaching methods when engaging with the written text.  This paper argues that there is an urgent need to develop inclusive strategies of support in the acting studio, which can enable those with dyslexia. The presence of students with dyslexia in actor-training institutions is an increasingly common occurrence. Currently, there is very little research or discourse regarding the facilitation of dyslexic acting students through adaptation of teaching approaches. For those with dyslexia, Shakespeare’s writing contributes additional challenges, with idiosyncrasies of word-use, unfamiliar language and mixed significations of meanings.    In this paper,  I will give an overview of my (concluded)  PhD research investigation into some dyslexic acting students’ rationale for devising  visual  constructs to represent the text, and describe some of my case-study/action-research trials with the participants; 12 2nd year Acting degree students assessed as dyslexic, during their work on the Shakespeare Acting unit. I will discuss the important role of reading, in expressing the ‘I, myself’ of the actor, and how the presence of dyslexia can inhibit the self-identity of the individual, affecting confidence, demonstration of ability and creative contributions. The paper focusses on the participants’ deviation from traditional acting processes wherein the written text is the singular working source, into the utilisation of drawing, PowerPoint image-slides and choreographed physical actions; translating the alphabetic text into a parallel semiotic language. These symbols facilitate aspects of understanding, speaking, hearing, memorisation and interpretation of Shakespeare’s text into live performance. Sharing examples of these drawings and actions, and an analysis of their differing functions, this paper will offer some ideas for practical teaching methods, which can by-pass the blocks caused by dyslexia.  Finally, I will question where the educator’s role as the enabler, in promoting a sense of self-discovery, and autonomy in their students, might differ from the role of the vocational trainer for the professional world.      

 

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Relationship Marketing Essay – Sweaty Betty Case Study

An analysis of Sweaty Betty’s use of founder integrity to develop affective commitment and trustworthiness with its customers. ​

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Border, Line, Architecture: Filarete’s ‘Trattato di Architettura’, Considered in Relation to the Medieval Manuscript Tradition (Research Projects 2007, Annual PhD Conference and Exhibition, 6 March 2007, The Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL)

Paper presented at Research Projects 2007, the Annual PhD Conference and Exhibition (6 March 2007) held at The Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL.

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The Arcadian Library: Bindings and Provenance, edited by Giles Mandelbrote and Willem de Bruijn

The Arcadian Library, based in London, is one of the finest collections of books reflecting European interest in the Arab and Islamic worlds. Among its c.10,000 volumes are many copies with important provenances and fine bindings. In this companion volume to no. 8 in the series, six distinguished authorities on the history of book-collecting and the ownership and use of books, and the history of bookbinding, deal with significant aspects of the Library’s holdings from these varied perspectives. 

The two opening essays, by Alastair Hamilton and Giles Mandelbrote, survey, respectively, notable European and British provenances, including royal, princely, aristocratic and learned owners, celebrated later collectors, and some remarkable annotated copies and copies associated with their authors. 

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Some Decorative Endpapers in the Arcadian Library

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Bookscapes: Towards a Conceptualisation of the Architectural Book

The paper proposes to address the space of the book as a site for both architectural practice and theoretical investigation

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Anticipating Antiquity: Jean-Jacques Boissard’s ‘Topographia Urbis Romae’ and the Reworking of Rome

At the end of the sixteenth century Jean Jacques Boissard published in Frankfurt on the Main a multi-volume book, in Latin, titled Romanae urbis topographia et antiquitates (1597-1602), which describes and depicts all the antiquities of Rome that could be of interest to a foreigner at the time. The book contains several hundred engravings of marble statues, amphitheatres, obelisks and tombstones, of which many were reused in subsequent editions such as the German translation, titled Topographia urbis Romae (1681) or ‘Topography of Rome’. Topographia rearranges material gleaned from the first tomes in a single volume according to what could be seen and observed in the space of four days time by a Wandersmann walking through the city. But does Topographia also make it possible for a reader to experience such a journey in the book, independently from any reference to an existing city? I argue in this article that Boissard effectively reworked or rebuilt, statue-by-statue as it were, the cityscape of Rome in the space of the book, thereby producing what I call a ‘bookscape’. Reading Topographia today means animating the scene of this displacement (from cityscape to bookscape) in view of the realisation of a fantasy – the fantasy of an eternal city, composed of fragments dispersed in time as well as in space. The object of this dispersion can be known as the Rome-scape.

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In the Space of the Book (PhD Research Conference and Exhibition: ‘Research Spaces: Materialisations of Practice in Art and Architecture’, 14–20 November 2005, The Bartlett School of Architecture and the Slade School of Fine Art, UCL)

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Imitating the Hypnerotomachia: Free Translations of an ‘Unreadable’ Text’ (Conference: ‘Text: Werkzeug und Quelle des Verstehens’, Zweites architekturtheoretisches Kolloquium der Stiftung Bibliothek Werner Oechslin, 25–28 April 2013, Einsiedeln)

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From Text to Theatre: An Architectural Reading of Heinrich Khunrath’s ‘Amphitheatrum Sapientiae Aeternae’ (1595; 1609)

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