Research artefacts - 3/41 - Arts University Bournemouth

Mike Brown, CC41 Utility Clothing

Reviewed in The Journal of Dress History for The Association of Dress Historians.

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Applying Shakespeare II – ‘Grounding the text through epistemic artefacts, actions and engineering’

Abstract

Grounding the text through epistemic artefacts, epistemic actions and epistemic engineering:  David’s autonomy over dyslexia when performing a Shakespeare sonnet

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Post-production: Special Effects

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Irish Animation and Radical Memory

This article considers the awakening of a radical indigenous tradition in the work of Irish animators in the early 21st Century. 

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Re-animating the Past: An Irish Animation History

In the late 1980s and early 1990s the presence of a large American animation studio in Ireland, under the stewardship of ex-Disney animation director Don Bluth, played a pivotal role in the development of the indigenous Irish animation industry, and constituted a colonial moment in Irish animation history. This paper aims to discuss the nascent Irish animation industry prior to the arrival of the Don Bluth studio, and to consider aspects of indigenous production onto which a global North American industrial model was imposed.

Aspects of postcolonial theory are used as a method of describing the historical circumstances that have determined the emergence of an indigenous Irish animation industry in the late 20th Century, and also deployed to illustrate how the social and historical aspects of animation production in Ireland reflect the postcolonial conditions of Irish society itself.

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Breaking Down, Going Feral: The Movements of Colour

This is a contribution to the section on colour photography guest-edited for the 40th anniversary issue of PhotoResearcher (also including articles by Dr Laure Blanc-Benon and Dr Caroline Fuchs).

Written in response to Rainbow’s Gravity (Mareike Bernien and Kerstin Schroedinger, 2014) and A 240 Seconds Analysis of Failure and Hopefulness (with Coke, Vinegar and other Tear Gas Remedies) (Basim Magdy, 2012), the text discusses the intrinsic elusiveness of colour photography vis-à-vis the complex historical baggage of its synthetic nature.

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The Surrealist Object and Photographic ‘Plasticity’: Sakata Minoru’s No Things (1939)

This book chapter is a result of a conference presentation and draws on my PhD thesis and forthcoming monograph. It discusses Sakata Minoru’s photographs published in different Japanese photo magazine in 1939 within the notion of the Surrealist object and the zōkei shashin (plastic photography) discourse.

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Zaha Hadid Architects: Evolution

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John Thorp and the Birth of Professional Architectural Modelmaking

Presentation to the 2019 SAHGB Architectural History Workshop

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Dazzle and the Art of Defence

An exhibition examining the roles of artists, designers, photographers and modelmakers in the defence of Britain during wartime. From the WWI Dazzle disruptive camouflage patterns designed by Norman Wilkinson, to the highly secret activities of the V-Section modelmakers in WWII, this exhibition draws together a range of artworks, designs, photographs and modern interpretations to mark both the centenary of the end of WWI and the eightieth anniversary of the start of WWII.

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The Official Feast: Cultural Tensions in UK Carnival

Abstract:

This paper reveals how UK street carnival is located within policy discourses that facilitate notions of creative economy, inter-place competition and the representation of institutionally-preferred versions of local, regional and national place-identity. The paper draws on ethnographic research within two community town carnivals and the professional Battle for the Winds carnival performances that launched the 2012 Olympic sailing at Weymouth. It considers the evolution of policy-driven carnival vocabularies that were designed to articulate preferred ‘Jurassic Coast’ and Olympic place identities for the south-west UK during 2012, and their effect on two vernacular, community street carnivals in East Devon and Dorset. The paper exposes the cultural tension between these vernacular events and the ‘official feast’ of Jurassic Coast and Olympic carnival, in terms of their performance of contradictory place-identities and contested notions of artistic community. It describes the popular challenge to aesthetic hegemony that these community carnivals presented during 2012. Finally, the author argues for a reassessment of the artistic value of vernacular carnivals, and affirms their status as a culture of resistance that creates alternative, sometimes inconvenient, symbolic constructions of community and place to those preferred by institutional actors operating within a neo-liberal discourse of inter-place competition.

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Entanglement in Shakespeare’s Text: Using Interpretive Mnemonics in ‘Using Art as Research in Teaching and Learning’

This chapter describes the study the author carried out with two 2nd year acting degree students assessed as dyslexic, and how they gained an autonomy over the processing and performing of Shakespeare’s text. The study aimed to develop inclusive teaching strategies to facilitate the abilities of those with dyslexia and bypass their difficulties with reading.  For those with dyslexia the reading and speaking of Shakespeare’s text can present significant challenges. This difficulty undermines practical work and masks the abilities of the dyslexic student actor. Conversely, Shakespeare’s rich language encourages a construction of meaning through visually interpreted modalities.  The study demonstrated that the participants created an additional text of drawings, colours and symbols, replacing the alphabetical text, embedding meaning into long-term memory. This chapter shares the experiences of the two students and the author as teacher. 

 

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