Research artefacts - 2/42 - Arts University Bournemouth

Autoethnography and postmemory: a methodology for the use of film forms as research.

Abstract: Practice as Research (PaR), and Practice-led Research, as studied by Hazel Smith, Roger T. Dean, and Graeme Sullivan, are increasingly being implemented in a wide range of disciplines. In this article, I will report on the methodological trajectory of my creative practice, an autoethnographic work that used film forms as research. The process progressed on three levels of investigation: the narrative, the epistemological, and the ontological. It developed from my personal experience and research in the archive, as a network of references supporting and responding to the needs of producing films through the exploration of prior film methodologies, and elaborating novel forms of mediation of history, memory, and postmemory.

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Out in the open and invisible: The city as archive in essay film San Sabba

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Screenwriting Animation in the Essay Film: ‘The challenges presented by Silenced History’

This article explores the use of animation in the essay film and analyses how screenwriting animation becomes a complex process of translation of the message the film wishes to address. With a focus on issues encountered in the development of two short essay films, Lunch with Family (2016) and San Sabba (2016), the article maps the process that in both cases guided the scripting of animated sequences, and analyses why in the editing room the director chose to use stills from the animations, instead. An example of the narrative techniques applied to mediate silenced history and postmemory in film, this contribution intends to add to the larger discussion on the current state of the art in screenwriting non-fiction.

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Illustrating the Jungle Camp: Potential and Limitations of Reportage and Identity Formation

In recent years the mainstream press in the UK and France have devoted significant attention to illustrated imagery in communicating contemporary events. In particular, the illustrated image via reportage has become a prominent tool for articulating the identities of individuals at the margin of society, for example, victims of war, refugees and displaced people.

This article explores this alternative method of reporting by focusing on the considerable coverage that the Jungle camp at Calais has received through reportage across the British and French press and beyond. Utilising Fuyuki Kurasawa’s essay “Humanitarianism and the Representation of Alterity: the Aporias and Prospects of Cosmopolitan Visuality”(2010), the article looks at the reporting of the refugees’ situation through an analysis of illustrations presented in articles and blogs published by The Guardian,Le Monde, Libérationand Arte. It examines the potential for reportage illustrations to provide ‘thicker’ representations, more complex discourses and new or alternative approaches to the construction of identities, in particular identities that constitute ‘the other’ within the contemporary European scopic regime.

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He Advance Teaching & Learning conference ‘ Innovative strategies for teaching acting students with dyslexia: Embodied cognition and visual interpretive mnemonics’

How might actor-trainers meet the needs of students

with dyslexia, especially when interacting with Shakespeare’s text? How might our methods break

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Keele University, conference paper: ‘Be My… ’: a consideration of student and staff partnership and Interdisciplinary learning and Teaching in action.

Presentation of conference paper ‘‘Be My… ’: a consideration of student and staff partnership and Interdisciplinary Learning and Teaching in action. Presented at Interdisciplinary Learning and Teaching Conference Practice and Knowledge Production. Tuesday 9th April 2019.

The paper considers the benefits and challenges of interdisciplinary learning and teaching notably within the context of a collaborative project where students and staff from very different disciplines had never worked together before. The presentation considers how the knowledge and skills of the particular art and design specialisms came together to address the project’s requirements and activities; how students and staff learning was enhanced through interdisciplinary learning.

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Plastic Fantastic? : The power of the use of plastic in object based-learning in higher education at AdvanceHE conference

This paper examined the value of the use of plastic objects in object-based learning (OBL) in higher education. It considered how, for example, a pair of 19th Century horn scissors, a 1930s shellac record and contemporary plastic disposable cutlery, can engage and perplex learners and provide potent tools for learning and teaching. It considered how PGCE students can explore and use plastic objects as a catalyst to develop innovative teaching ideas. The presentation considered how the objects’ plastics properties, qualities and associations can intrigue and arrest learners’ attention and can promote and provoke important debate and contemplation as students consider, evaluate and re-evaluate attitudes regarding plastic… and learning and teaching.

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The Power of Plastic in Object Based-Learning: a consideration of the use of historical plastic objects as dynamic tools for learning and teaching in higher education at Plastics Heritage Conference, 2019, Lisbon, Portugal.

The paper considered how the plastic nature of plastic design objects – the object’s plastic properties, qualities and associations – can intrigue and arrest learners’ attention and can promote and provoke important debate and contemplation as students consider, evaluate and indeed re-evaluate attitudes regarding plastic.This paper examined the use of historical plastic objects as powerful tools for learning and teaching in Object-Based Learning (OBL) in higher education

The study examines undergraduate workshops that use objects from the Museum of Design in Plastics (MoDiP), Arts University Bournemouth, UK. It considers and how students physically handle, scrutinize and interrogate objects. The paper is informed by key OBL texts (e.g. Chatterjee and Hannan, 2015; Chatterjee and Duhs, 2010, Boddington, Boys and Speight (2013) Hennigar Smith, 1999 and Hooper-Greenhill, 1999) that advocate  the value of OBL. Key texts that discuss objects and how we relate to them also inform this paper (e.g. Meikle, 1997; Sudjic, 2009).

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‘Plastic Fantastic?: The power of the use of plastic in object-based learning in higher education’ at AdvanceHE annual conference,

This paper examined the value of the use of plastic objects in object-based learning (OBL) in higher education. It considered how, for example, a pair of 19th Century horn scissors, a 1930s shellac record and contemporary plastic disposable cutlery, can engage and perplex learners and provide potent tools for learning and teaching. It considered how PGCE students can explore and use plastic objects as a catalyst to develop innovative teaching ideas. The presentation considered how the objects’ plastics properties, qualities and associations can intrigue and arrest learners’ attention and can promote and provoke important debate and contemplation as students consider, evaluate and re-evaluate attitudes regarding plastic… and learning and teaching.

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Creative learning spaces: Facilitating student-led learning

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Head, heart, hand

Royal Academy auditorium

Joint paper delivered with Dominic Shepherd at Teaching Painting conference on the topic of a teaching painting in a new teaching space called PAINTLAB at AUB

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Idiot Joy Showland

Performance at 6 dogs project space Athens

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