Research artefacts - Arts University Bournemouth

(2019) The Urban Gypsies (Photography)

Enter the private world of a group of Travellers living beneath The Westway, London’s vast elevated highway connecting suburbia to the city. Part of a unique culture so often stigmatised in the media, this close-knit community is under increasing pressure to move on and risk losing their identity for good. Many in the community feel the way they are treated is the last from of acceptable racism. 

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Mike Brown, CC41 Utility Clothing

Reviewed in The Journal of Dress History for The Association of Dress Historians.

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Applying Shakespeare II – ‘Grounding the text through epistemic artefacts, actions and engineering’

Abstract

Grounding the text through epistemic artefacts, epistemic actions and epistemic engineering:  David’s autonomy over dyslexia when performing a Shakespeare sonnet

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Post-production: Special Effects

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Irish Animation and Radical Memory

This article considers the awakening of a radical indigenous tradition in the work of Irish animators in the early 21st Century. 

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Re-animating the Past: An Irish Animation History

In the late 1980s and early 1990s the presence of a large American animation studio in Ireland, under the stewardship of ex-Disney animation director Don Bluth, played a pivotal role in the development of the indigenous Irish animation industry, and constituted a colonial moment in Irish animation history. This paper aims to discuss the nascent Irish animation industry prior to the arrival of the Don Bluth studio, and to consider aspects of indigenous production onto which a global North American industrial model was imposed.

Aspects of postcolonial theory are used as a method of describing the historical circumstances that have determined the emergence of an indigenous Irish animation industry in the late 20th Century, and also deployed to illustrate how the social and historical aspects of animation production in Ireland reflect the postcolonial conditions of Irish society itself.

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Conference paper: ‘Be My… ’: a consideration of student and staff partnership and Interdisciplinary learning and teaching in action.

Conference paper presented at the Interdisciplinary Learning and Teaching Conference –

Practice and Knowledge Production. 

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Breaking Down, Going Feral: The Movements of Colour

This is a contribution to the section on colour photography guest-edited for the 40th anniversary issue of PhotoResearcher (also including articles by Dr Laure Blanc-Benon and Dr Caroline Fuchs).

Written in response to Rainbow’s Gravity (Mareike Bernien and Kerstin Schroedinger, 2014) and A 240 Seconds Analysis of Failure and Hopefulness (with Coke, Vinegar and other Tear Gas Remedies) (Basim Magdy, 2012), the text discusses the intrinsic elusiveness of colour photography vis-à-vis the complex historical baggage of its synthetic nature.

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The Surrealist Object and Photographic ‘Plasticity’: Sakata Minoru’s No Things (1939)

This book chapter is a result of a conference presentation and draws on my PhD thesis and forthcoming monograph. It discusses Sakata Minoru’s photographs published in different Japanese photo magazine in 1939 within the notion of the Surrealist object and the zōkei shashin (plastic photography) discourse.

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Zaha Hadid Architects: Evolution

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John Thorp and the Birth of Professional Architectural Modelmaking

Presentation to the 2019 SAHGB Architectural History Workshop

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Dazzle and the Art of Defence

An exhibition examining the roles of artists, designers, photographers and modelmakers in the defence of Britain during wartime. From the WWI Dazzle disruptive camouflage patterns designed by Norman Wilkinson, to the highly secret activities of the V-Section modelmakers in WWII, this exhibition draws together a range of artworks, designs, photographs and modern interpretations to mark both the centenary of the end of WWI and the eightieth anniversary of the start of WWII.

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