Research artefacts - Arts University Bournemouth

‘Be My…Valentine’s Exhibition: Be My Partner student-staff partnership at RAISE conference, Newcastle University

Conference paper presented at the RAISE “Exploring the Impact of Student Engagement”, Newcastle University, 4-6 September 2019.

This paper discussed the ‘Be My… Valentine’ project (2017) where students and staff worked in partnership with a UK museum in the co-creation and co-curatorship of a unique creative public exhibition and number of related activities. It considered how dynamic student and staff partnerships developed across a range of different disciplines as four undergraduate courses at the Arts University Bournemouth, UK, united in the creation of a unique exhibition. Importantly the paper considered the subsequent unexpected activities and outcomes that flourished as student and staff partnerships developed beyond the exhibition.The discussion explored the benefits and challenges of partnership work and how this collaborative project resulted in a unique creative community of practice

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‘Be My…Valentine’s Exhibition: Be My Partner student-staff partnership at RAISE conference, Newcastle University

Conference paper presented at the RAISE “Exploring the Impact of Student Engagement”, Newcastle University, 4-6 September 2019.

This paper discussed the ‘Be My… Valentine’ project (2017) where students and staff worked in partnership with a UK museum in the co-creation and co-curatorship of a unique creative public exhibition and number of related activities. It considered how dynamic student and staff partnerships developed across a range of different disciplines as four undergraduate courses at the Arts University Bournemouth, UK, united in the creation of a unique exhibition. Importantly the paper considered the subsequent unexpected activities and outcomes that flourished as student and staff partnerships developed beyond the exhibition.The discussion explored the benefits and challenges of partnership work and how this collaborative project resulted in a unique creative community of practice

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‘Wow: the power of objects in object-based learning and research’ at ‘Objects Matter: Design Education and Learning through Objects in the Museum

Invited speaker at ‘Objects Matter: Design Education and Learning through Objects in the Museum – a one-day workshop that focused on object handling in design education. The aim of the workshop was to bring together experts in design education, museum learning, design history, contextual studies, and design pedagogy to explore the ways in which objects can be employed as important tools for learning and teaching design and contextual studies in Higher and Further Education’

Kirsten discussed:

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Style, Structure and Allusion in Lucifer Rising

 Lucifer Rising can be understood as the culmination of Kenneth Anger’s Magick Lantern Cycle. The power of this film, in part, rests on the way in which Anger alludes to a range of esoteric myths and Gods, without contextualising them in the way a more traditional film would do. This article sets out to reveal the various allusions, and in turn elucidate Anger’s unique approach to filmmaking.

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It is Alive if You Are: Defining Experimental Animation

A chapter from the book I co-edited on experimental animation. It offers an overview of previous attempts to define the field, and offers an alternative.

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Communicating and sharing teaching strategies for Acting students with dyslexia:Embodied cognition and visual mnemonics

Abstract

The presence of students with SpLD (dyslexia) in actor-training institutions is an increasingly common occurrence. This article argues that there is an urgent need to develop inclusive strategies of support in the voice and acting studio that can effectively enable those with dyslexia, while promoting equality of opportunity for realization of potential.  Focusing on the author’s research concerning the facilitation of acting students with dyslexia in the areas of reading, speaking and acting of Shakespeare, this article begins by highlighting specific difficulties presented by dyslexia. It goes on to describe a case-study of two acting students with dyslexia and their visually led methods employed in entering Shakespeare’s text. The workshop section offers a pedagogical strategy for the inclusive voice class when working on Shakespeare, while the section dedicated to participant three demonstrates how a dyslexic acting student uses a visually led approach in enhancing her articulation of speech and extrapolation of meaning in the text. Underpinning the investigations with analysis and theory, the author concludes by sharing her research findings, seeking to stimulate further discussion within the community of voice and actor- training.

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Teaching Strategies for Neurodiversity and Dyslexia in Actor Training:Sensing Shakespeare

Teaching Strategies for Neurodiversity and Dyslexia in Actor Training addresses some of the challenges met by acting students with dyslexia and highlights the abilities demonstrated by individuals with specific learning differences in actor training. Utilising Shakespeare’s text as a laboratory of practice, the book offers six tested teaching strategies, created from practical and theoretical research investigations with dyslexic acting students. It is a valuable resources for voice and actor training,professional performance, and for those who are curious about emancipatory methods that support difference through humanistic teaching philosophies. 

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‘Lunch with Family’

In Lunch with Family, I use film to question my archival research and personal engagement in the discovery of the Slav silenced history of Trieste, a city-symbol on the former Iron Curtain, Italy. The film tells the story of Vladimir Turina, a relative I had no knowledge of, who was arrested, put on trial and imprisoned by the Fascist regime. The film maps the forced Italianisation of half a million Slavs, their organisation in anti-Fascist groups, the burning of their books and cultural institutions, and the final attempt to delete this ethnic group, which in Trieste in 1918 was larger than in Ljubljana – the Capital of Slovenia. The research is interdisciplinary, based on a preliminary study of archival material on a niche of Italian history that has been silenced, which establishes the use of research through film as an adequate epistemological methodology to answer the research questions.

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Autoethnography and postmemory: a methodology for the use of film forms as research.

Abstract: Practice as Research (PaR), and Practice-led Research, as studied by Hazel Smith, Roger T. Dean, and Graeme Sullivan, are increasingly being implemented in a wide range of disciplines. In this article, I will report on the methodological trajectory of my creative practice, an autoethnographic work that used film forms as research. The process progressed on three levels of investigation: the narrative, the epistemological, and the ontological. It developed from my personal experience and research in the archive, as a network of references supporting and responding to the needs of producing films through the exploration of prior film methodologies, and elaborating novel forms of mediation of history, memory, and postmemory.

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Out in the open and invisible: The city as archive in essay film San Sabba

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Screenwriting Animation in the Essay Film: ‘The challenges presented by Silenced History’

This article explores the use of animation in the essay film and analyses how screenwriting animation becomes a complex process of translation of the message the film wishes to address. With a focus on issues encountered in the development of two short essay films, Lunch with Family (2016) and San Sabba (2016), the article maps the process that in both cases guided the scripting of animated sequences, and analyses why in the editing room the director chose to use stills from the animations, instead. An example of the narrative techniques applied to mediate silenced history and postmemory in film, this contribution intends to add to the larger discussion on the current state of the art in screenwriting non-fiction.

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Illustrating the Jungle Camp: Potential and Limitations of Reportage and Identity Formation

In recent years the mainstream press in the UK and France have devoted significant attention to illustrated imagery in communicating contemporary events. In particular, the illustrated image via reportage has become a prominent tool for articulating the identities of individuals at the margin of society, for example, victims of war, refugees and displaced people.

This article explores this alternative method of reporting by focusing on the considerable coverage that the Jungle camp at Calais has received through reportage across the British and French press and beyond. Utilising Fuyuki Kurasawa’s essay “Humanitarianism and the Representation of Alterity: the Aporias and Prospects of Cosmopolitan Visuality”(2010), the article looks at the reporting of the refugees’ situation through an analysis of illustrations presented in articles and blogs published by The Guardian,Le Monde, Libérationand Arte. It examines the potential for reportage illustrations to provide ‘thicker’ representations, more complex discourses and new or alternative approaches to the construction of identities, in particular identities that constitute ‘the other’ within the contemporary European scopic regime.

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