Earlier this month, third-year BA (Hons) Fine Art students specialising in sculpture took part in a workshop with contemporary artist, Tom Dale.

Tom Dale has shown works internationally everywhere from Raster Gallery in Warsaw, Poland, to the Nicosia Municipal Arts Centre (NiMAC) in Cyprus, and Latitude Festival in Southwold, England. His work is arrestingly comical, often layering visual metaphor with a subversion of material and object usage. Tom also works as a visiting tutor on the BA (Hons) Fine Art course, taking one-to-one tutorials and teaching sessions.

THREE-DAY BRIEF

The aim of this workshop was to simulate a professional working environment of a working artist in a very condensed manner. The students were given a brief by Tom to formulate ideas and scale diagrams in groups, and then proposed their selections to the Facilities team at AUB. The students went on to build their proposed structures, all in just three days.

AN EVEL KNIEVEL INFLUENCE

Third-year student, Rachel Mortlock, was one of the 14 students that took part. She said:

Working in collaboration with Tom Dale, we were given the opportunity to design and build a public sculpture to sit in the courtyard of our university. The sculpture took the form of a 4.8 metre, seemingly useless ramp based on the ramps Evel Knievel performed his motorcycle stunts on.

We jumped at the opportunity to work on this project. We called the ramp ‘U500’ due to it coincidently being 500mm taller than Tony Cragg’s sculpture ‘Tri-some’ that it sat beside.

The project not only taught us how to work in a group but was also an amazing opportunity to work with a practicing artist specialising in mediums similar to us. We learnt a lot of technical skills along the way, but most importantly, the project taught us how to work on a large scale in a short period of time.”

A big thanks to Tom Dale and the students for producing such fantastic work, and Senior Lecturer, Harry Meadows, for organising the workshop.

Read more about our BA (Hons) Fine Art course.

Images courtesy of Samuel Golley.